The Monday American | American History Podcast

The podcast that never takes the 'story' out of American history.

A Podcast revisiting American history one story at a time. Studying history teaches that contrary to popular belief, hindsight isn't always 20/20. A history podcast presenting American history while ensuring the "story" is never left out of history.

Filtering by Category: American History

Special D-Day Post

Celebrating the 75th Anniversary of D-Day with a quick post of the first radio announcement that Americans heard. Robert St. John of NBC News reported the news at 3:30AM Eastern War Time.

Video released for the 75th Anniversary of D-Day from the United States Navy’s “All Hands” Magazine, narrated by Jocko Willink US Navy Seal, ret.

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The Great Depression: The Dustbowl of Despair

America reels in the face of the worst economic disaster ever faced. The attempts to bring the country and its people out of the Dust-bowl of despair only heighten the problems at hand. Ironically enough, the only alleviation to the Nation’s internal issue is brought about by an external and foreign source.

Sources Used:

  1. Beschloss, Michael. Presidents of War. Random House, 2018.

  2. Cooper, William J., Tom E. Terrill, and Christopher Childers. The American South. a History. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2017.

  3. Egan, Timothy. The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2013.

  4. Powell, Jim. FDRs Folly: How Roosevelt and His New Deal Prolonged the Great Depression. Rocklin, CA: Forum, 2004.

  5. Schlesinger, Arthur M. The Crisis of the Old Order, 1919-1933: 1919-1933, The Age of Roosevelt. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2003.

  6. Shales, Amity. The Forgotten Man. New York, NY: Harpercollins Publishers, 2008.

  7. Roosevelt, Franklin D. (Franklin Delano), 1882-1945. Franklin D. Roosevelt's Inaugural Address of 1933. Washington, DC :National Archives and Records Administration, 1988. https://guides.lib.monash.edu/c.php?g=219786&p=1454691

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The Korean War (Part III): A War No Victor

Details on our Audience Appreciation Giveaway are in the intro!

The Korean War is a conflict that has been largely forgotten from the memories of current. As so it shows us not only the lessons we can learn from history, but that the simple knowledge of an event happening is a lesson all its own.

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The Korean War (Part II): A Brand New War

Great News! We now offer official podcast artwork apparel and more!  Visit the online store here!

When the Chinese launch their first attack against U.S. and U.N. troops at Unsan and later at Chosin, the war takes on an entirely new phase; almost as if it became a whole new conflict altogether. 

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The Korean War (Part I): The Forgotten War and Forgotten Lesson

The Korean War is known, ironically so, for being America's forgotten war. It was a war that sparked America's involvement in southeast Asia for next thirty years. 

Part one of this series on the war begins by explaining how we got to the point of war in Korea, and the history of Korea itself. 

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The Battle of the Bulge: Hitler's Final Attack

This episode tells the story of the Battle of the Bulge, one of the worst battles in American history. This battle took place in late December of 1944 in the Ardennes Forest region of Belgium, near the town of Bastogne.

This episode is brought to you by the book titled "Last Judgement", written by Michael Canon. To purchase a copy for only $7.99, click here. Michael Canon is also working on a graphic novel based off of the book. You can see a preview for the graphic novel set to come out in early 2019 by clicking here. You can help donate to support the project by clicking here

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Cowboys and Indians: America's Westward Expansion

The story of how America grew from coast to coast while also establishing a uniquely American character of frontier inspired traits. America's journey west is one of triumph and one of tragedy, its the story of how we got here today.

We are now on Patreon! If you want to help us in our goal to get more people hooked on history, visit our Patreon page by clicking here!

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Interview With Bruce Carlson, host of "My History Can Beat Up Your Politics" podcast.

We are joined by Bruce Carlson who hosts the podcast called "My History Can Beat Up Your Politics."

Bruce is a very educated man in both history and politics and the conversation we had is a great footnote to the recently concluded Vietnam War Series. 

To find out more about Bruce and his podcast you can visit his website by clicking the link above or listen to his show anywhere you find podcasts!

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The Vietnam War (Part V): America's Costly Lesson

Nixon allowed himself to believe he could use brute force to force the North Vietnamese into a peace settlement adhering to his definition of "peace with honor". Each step and decision he took became more obsessive, paranoid and constitutionally unsound as he drug America through its final stages of the conflict in Vietnam that would become America's longest war; as well as one of it's most costly lessons.

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The Vietnam War (Part IV): Tet Unravels the West

The Tet Offensive pushes the conflict in Vietnam to a boiling point both abroad and within the United States. The American public after Tet, the odd victory without reward, finally was able to see the real situation in Vietnam. What was even more jarring to the public than the "principals" and their malfeasance was the unsettling realization that the war in Vietnam had somehow started a civil war in America.

This episode is Sponsored by: 

Sudio is a company making studio quality headphones with a stylish design; all while not overcharging just because they can. Visit the Sudio website and use the promo code THEMONDAYAMERICAN for 15% off any order!

"The Three Brothers" This is a book written by Australian author Stephen E. Marantelli. The best way to sum up this book is the phrase "history with a mystery". Stephen sent me a copy and I've been thoroughly enjoying it! If you're a fan of history this book is a must read!

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The Vietnam War (Part III): Limited War, Without Limits.

Picking up where we left off in part II, we learn a bit more about who LBJ was and what helped him to make the fateful decisions made throughout his administration regarding the Vietnam War, its escalation and its subsequent veiling to the American public. 

The former Senate Majority Leader was a master of manipulation, skilled like none other in the art of politics, personal flattery and the ability to read a man in order to face off against him. Lyndon B. Johnson masterfully avoided the rebuke of Congress and the American people while further involving the nation in a conflict with no hope of resolution. 

Using the attack of Pleiku airbase, as well as the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, LBJ was able to position himself as the President leading the charge of retaliation against the "aggressor" North Vietnamese. Operation "ROLLING THUNDER" would kick off the bombing campaign that would prove the North Vietnamese would not only withdraw in their campaign, but they would escalate it on a magnitude with which the United States was un-willing and un-able to match.

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The Vietnam War (Part I): The Dominos Begin to Fall

 The analogy of Domino's falling is admittedly a lazy subtitle on our part. That said, even though it rings as a loud cliché it is easily the most appropriate way to describe the entire American involvement in the Indochina (Vietnam), South Asia and overall struggle against the "un-ceasing" growth of communism. 

Part One of the series provides the context that is necessary to glean the story out of the Indochina conflict. Without understanding not only how, but why these events came to be, the story within the history doesn't get through and it doesn't teach those of us looking back at it today. 

The difficult aspect of covering this specific war in American history is the sheer amount of lies, misdirection and flat out confusing amount of sources and historical data are available. It is ironically fitting however, the Vietnam war remains one of the most complex and farthest thing from "simple" that endures in the history of America. 

Part one of the series begins the journey that is the story of the Vietnam War, we hope you enjoy.


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The American Civil War (Part V): A Nation Born of Blood

Part Five of the series opens with the full realization of the Confederate States of America that the war cannot be won setting in. General Ulysses S. Grant moves into Richmond, VA and occupies the recently abandoned Confederate government headquarters.Robert E. Lee takes his men on a "march from hell" only to realize the only option is surrender, which he does on April 9, 1865. When everything seems to be coming together, the nation loses Abraham Lincoln to an assassin's bullet; altering the course of the new nation forever...

Sources Used

Ellis, Joseph J. Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation. Vintage Books, 2000.

Winik, Jay. April 1865 the month that saved America. New York, NY: Harper Perennial, 2008.

Blight, David W. Race and reunion: the Civil War in American memory. Cambridge: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2002.

Alexander, Edward Porter. Military Memoirs of a Confederate. New York, NY:  C. Scribners Sons, 1907.

Fellman, Michael, Lesley J. Gordon, and Daniel E. Sutherland. This terrible war: the Civil War and its aftermath. New York: Pearson Longman, 2008.

Coski, John M. The Confederate battle flag: Americas most embattled emblem. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2006.

Taylor, Michael W. The Cry is War, War, War. Dayton, OH: Morningside Press, 1994.

Geer, Walter. Campaigns of the Civil War. Old Saybrook, CT: Konecky & Konecky, 2009.

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The American Civil War (Part II)

This episode begins with the raid on Harpers Ferry by John Brown. In doing so he becomes the ultimate martyr for his cause, inciting the national debate on the slavery issue further than ever before...

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The American Civil War (Part I)

 

The beginning of the civil war story starts earlier than you might imagine. We back up all the way to 1790 where George Washington announced his retirement from politics with his famous farewell address. It was a few months prior to this event that led Washington to address to the nation just what he felt was necessary in order to preserve the life of this new democratic republic that the United States had formed. He issued a warning that the biggest threats to democracy were the people themselves not understanding the freedom with which they were granted, and not unifying as a nation of United States. The reason Washington had these concerns was due to a debate about slavery that occurred a few months prior to his address. The slavery issue came to the house floor and was debated with fervor and heated conversation. The eventual outcome would be that due to the passing of the United States Constitution years prior, congress had no right to touch the topic of slavery through the year 1808. It ended with the abolitionists and pro-slavery arguers understanding that not only could the United States of America not do anything about the issue right then, due to the overwhelming understanding that the states dependent on it for their economy would surely succeed and destroy the Union right away; but they understood that they weren't even ready to talk about the topic due to the fact that neither side had a realistic and attainable solution. Episode 24, Part one of the Civil War series begins the story of the Civil War in the midst of the heated congressional debate about what this new nation known as the United States of America will do about the topic of Slavery. 



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